How Professional Terrazzo Floor Polishing Transforms An Old Terrazzo Floor

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/terrazzo/terrazzo-polishing-much-wenlock-shropshire/

This terrazzo polishing work in Much Wenlock came to our attention after our client discovered a Terrazzo tile floor underneath brown ceramic floor tiles.

Much Wenlock is in Shropshire, located between Shrewsbury and Bridgnorth. It is close to historic Ironbridge and Telford.

Discovering A Hiden Terrazzo Floor

The client was refurbishing an old farmhouse with dark brown glazed floor tiles in the kitchen and hallways. They had planned to dig out the existing floor and replace it with flagstones to match flagstones in other rooms.

However, as they started to remove the tiles they found a Terrazzo tiled floor in the kitchen and quarry tile floors in the hallways. The floors looked to be in good condition. So the plans were changed to restore the floors rather than replace them.

After removing the old tiles and adhesive, they cleaned and finished the quarry tiles with red floor wax. However, their cleaning could not remove the ingrained soil from the surface of theTerrazzo tiles.

So it was time for the Simon, the homeowner to seek out professional assistance. Simon searched for Terrazzo floor polishing services online, found our website and saw that we restore both quarry tile and Terrazzo floors.

Simon emailed me photos of the floors. I identified the floors as terrazzo marble with black and white marble chips. I knew at once that I could meet Simon’s desire to have the terrazzo restored to a beautiful polished finish.

terrazzo polishing much wenlock shropshire

The contractor who had removed the old tiles and tile adhesive met me at the property. He told me that that it had taken him a number of days to remove the adhesive and he was interested to see how I was going to restore and polish the tiles.

I told him that it was a pity they had not contacted me earlier because I could have removed the old tile adhesive in a matter of hours and it would not have added significantly to the cost of the job as I had to grind the floor anyway to remove the lippage.
This photo of polished floors shows Terrazzo polishing work in Birmingham, where we removed the floor grinding machine removing the old tile adhesive before grinding and polishing the floor.
(Picture of Birmingham)

 

There were three main problems with this terrazzo floor

  • Poor cleaning using the wrong cleaning chemicals made the cement surface porous allowing soil and tile adhesive to soak into the surface.
  • Throughout the floor, there were uneven tiles and lippage between 1 and 3mm in height.

 

terrazzo floor before being restored by abbey floor care

The terrazzo polishing work had to start with grinding the floor smooth using a planetary grinding machine and metal diamond tooling.

Terrazzo Floor Grinding And Polishing – The Work Starts

The grinding process removed around 4mm from the surface of the floor, solving a number of issues:

  • removed the lippage and made the floor smooth
  • removed the porous surface, revealing a new, solid surface
  • removed the ingrained soil
  • removed the tile adhesive that had soaked into the surface of the tiles.

terrazzo floor being ground by abbey floor care

The grinding process areas revealed porosity in the new surface of the tiles throughout the floor. The hole sizes ranged from 1mm diameter to 3mm diameter.

I needed to fill the holes with a hard resin before honing.  So I left the floor overnight to dry ready for filling he next day.

The homeowner helped me by sticking tape on the porous areas.

terrazzo floor with markers showing areas of porosity

I started the next day by filling the holes in the white tiles with a white hard filler. There was probably some porosity in the black tiles, but it was practically impossible to see owing to the black background.

abbey floor care filling holes in terrazzo tiles

The filler starts to harden after a few minutes. So the key here is to make up small quantities of filler and use it before it starts to harden.

It took me around 2 hours to fill the holes and then the floor was left for a few hours to allow the filler to cure sufficiently to start honing.

terrazzo floor after filler has set hard

Before starting the terrazzo polishing I needed to hone the floor starting with 50 grit resin diamond pads, followed by 100 grit pads.

I left the floor to dry again overnight ready for applying an impregnating sealer.

The next day I applied a solvent based impregnating sealer and left it for a couple of hours to soak deep into the floor.

Then I started honing the floor with 200 grit resin diamonds followed by 400 and 800 grit.

We used 1,500 3,000 grit pads in the polishing phase to give the floor a deep shine.

polished terrazzo floor in much wenlock displaying a beautiful deep shine

The room is quite dark, so the photos don’t show the beautiful gloss of the final finish. However, the reflections from the windows and the lights give an indication of the beauty of the final polish.

The grinding machine does not get beneath kitchen furniture and leaves a 3mm gap at the edge of the floor.

So I used an edging machine and the same diamond grits to grind and polish these difficult to reach areas.

edging machine grinding and polishing under kitchen cuboards

Quarry Tile Floor Polishing

quarry tile floor much wenlock shropshire abbey floor careIt looked to me as if the homeowner did a good job of restoring the quarry tiles, the only issue I could see was efflorescence on some of the tiles.

Considering the tiles were covered for at least 30 years, it isn’t surprising that there is some efflorescence. I am confident that once the floor has settled and regained its moisture balance, the efflorescence will subside.

They may need to remove the wax from the affected tiles as the wax can trap the efflorescence. However only around 5% of the flooring was affected, so removing the wax is a simple diy job.

 

If you have a terrazzo floor in need of polishing please don’t hesitate to contact me here, I’ll be happy to help.

Stone Floor Cleaning Sealing Restoration Birmingham

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/stone-restoration-birmingham/

lady-in-leicester-worried-about-her-dirty-stone-floor

Stone Floor Cleaning Birmingham For A Wonderful Clean Look

  • Is Your Messy, Dull Tile Floor Giving You Sleepless Nights
  • Planning To Restore A Slate Floor.
  • Has Your Indian Sandstone Floor Lost Its Appeal.


LET ME HELP


CLICK TO START

Reviews From Some Of Our Happy Customers

Check Out How We Solve These Stone Floor Problems

  • Dull spots and etch marks
  • Grimy Lifeless Finish
  • Scuffs and Scratches
  • Ugly Holes
  • Horrible Grout
  • Loss Of Colour
  • Worn Sealer
  • Dirty Tiles
  • Deep Scratches and Chips
  • Uneven tiles and Lippage

As well as looking beautiful, your floor will be so much easier to clean. High-quality sealers and finishes make your stone highly water and soil repellent, which means that they are easier to clean.

Our technical experts will also give you a tailored care guide, showing you:

  • how often you should clean your floor
  • the best way to clean your floor
  • the best equipment to use
  • the right floor cleaners that will help protect your floor rather than damage it.

The result is a beautiful clean floor that will stay clean for longer

In Just Four Easy Steps Your Stone Floors Can Look Beautiful Again

1. Contact Us By Email Or Phone

Call 0800 6795 0180 or click right here to contact us.

2. Tell Us All About Your Problems

Our contact form gives you the opportunity to tell us all about the issues with your floor. A picture speaks a thousand words, so please send photos of your floors highlighting the issues. We may call you to have a chat about your floor to understand your problems.

3. Receive A Free Of Charge Cost Estimate

In most situations we can give you a reasonable guide of the costs included in any restoration.

We sill send you full documentation, detailing;

  • The costs.
    • There’ll be no covert costs or surcharges, our rates will be completely up front.
  • The work involved.
    • We will include details about similar work we have done so you can get an idea of what’s involved and the finish you will get.
  • The timescale.

So you are armed with all the information you need to make a considered, informed decision.

4. Agree A Date To Start The Work

If you feel that the estimated cost is within your budget, we’ll organize an appointment to start the work. A couple of days prior to your job, if you prefer, we can give you a call to confirm that is ok and validate the details.

We will show up on the agreed date and at the agreed to start work.

Get In Touch
You can always phone us on 0800 695 0180 or just complete the simple contact form below for a free quotation.

We service the following postal code districts in Birmingham

B1–B4 (Birmingham City Centre, Ladywood), B5 (Digbeth), B6 (Aston), B7 (Nechells), B8 (Washwood Heath, Ward End, Saltley), B9 (Bordesley Green), B10 (Small Heath), B11 (Sparkhill, Tyseley), B12 (Balsall Heath, Sparkbrook), B13 (Moseley, Billesley), B14 (Kings Heath, Yardley Wood, Brandwood, Druids Heath, Warstock), B15 (Edgbaston, Chad Valley), B16 (Edgbaston, Ladywood), B17 (Harborne), B18 (Winson Green), B19 (Lozells, Newtown, Birchfield), B20 (Birchfield, Handsworth Wood), B21 (Handsworth), B23-B23 (Erdington, Short Heath), B24 (Erdington, Tyburn), B25 (Yardley), B26 (Sheldon, Yardley), B27 (Acocks Green), B28 (Hall Green), B29 (Selly Oak, Bournbrook), B30 (Bournville, Cotteridge, Stirchley), B31 (Northfield), B32 (Woodgate, Bartley Green, Quinton), B33 (Kitts Green), B34 (Shard End, Buckland End), B35 (Castle Vale), B36 (Hodge Hill, Castle Bromwich), B37 (Chelmsley Wood, Marston Green), B38 (Kings Norton), B40 (National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham International Airport), B42 (Perry Barr, Great Barr, Hamstead), B43 (Great Barr), B44 (Perry Barr, Kingstanding, Great Barr), B45 (Rednal, Rubery), B46 (Water Orton, Coleshill), B47 (Hollywood, Wythall), B48 (Alvechurch), B49–B50 (Alcester), B60–B61 (Bromsgrove), B62–B63 (Halesowen), B64 (Cradley Heath), B65 (Rowley Regis), B66–B67 (Smethwick), B68–B69 (Oldbury), B70–B71 (West Bromwich), B72 (Sutton Coldfield town centre, Maney, Wylde Green), B73 (Boldmere, New Oscott, Wylde Green), B74 (Four Oaks, Mere Green, Little Aston, Streetly), B75 (Sutton Trinity, Falcon Lodge, Rectory), B76 (Walmley), B77–B79 (Tamworth), B80 (Studley), B90 (Shirley, Wythall, Majors Green, Dickens Heath), B91–B94 (Olton, Solihull), B95 (Henley-in-Arden), B96–B98 (Redditch)

Birmingham was known as the “city of  a thousand trades” as it was a world leader in the manufacturing items like buckles, guns, jewlery and pens.

The history of Birmingham dates back 10,500 years ago with habitation along the valley of the river Rea. The Doomsday Book of 1086, records Birmingham having 9 houses valued at £1. However in 1166 Peter de Birmingham was granted the rights to hold a weekly market, transforming the prospects of the small settlement. The market was located around St.Martin’s church, one of the oldest buildings in Birmingham. The markets still exist in the same place over 800 years later.

In the 16th century Birmingham gradually transformed from a market town into a major industrial centre. With the benefit of it’s location in the centre of the country, road links and natural resources, the area drew industries such as cutlery, weapons and guns.

In the 18th century, Birmingham had become a major European centre for metalworking, producing buckles, buttons and small metal fabrications. The industry was dominated by the manufacturers Matthew Boulton and JohnTaylor. Boulton, along with James Watt and Erasmus Darwin founded the Lunar Society, recognised worldwide for  innovative and pioneering ideas in science, arts, philosophy and commerce. The Lunar Society got its name because it gathered during the full moon at Soho House , which is today a museum.

This period saw a great expansion of the canal network into Birmingham. The canals allowed quick and easy transport of raw materials and finished goods, giving Birmingham a major competitive edge over other rival manufacturing areas. Birmingham quickly became a worldwide “powerhouse” of manufacturing and invention, becoming “the City of a Thousand Trades’ and the “Toyshop of Europe”.

In 1850, Ralph Heaton set up the Birmingham mint to strike coins and medals. In1853, owing to a lack of capacity at the Royal Mint in London, the Birmingham mint won it’s first contract to strike British coins. In two years the mint struck over 500 tons of copper. During their peak the Birmingham mint was striking around 1100,000 coins per day.

Birmingham was also a major manufacturer of steel pen nibs, claiming that 75% of everything written in the world at the time was written with a  pen made in Birmingham.

Today, over 40% of the UK’s hand made jewelry products are made in Birmigham’s world famous Jewelry Quarter.

The rapid economic growth of the 19th century led to massive growth in the city’s population. The mid 19th century saw the development of  Back to Back housing as aresponse to the rapidly increasing population. Economic growth brought great propserity  a small number of people, but many people saw little benefit.  The increase in population saw housing conditions fall, with poor education and health worstening during the Industrial Revolution. Thankfully there were people who set out to make changes. Reform had started in 1799 when Dr John Ash, supported by wealthy individuals such as Matthew Boulton, built a the Birmingham free hospital.

In the late 19th century, lead by Joseph Chamberlain, Birmingham became an international leader in social reform.  Over half of the population of Birmingham was dependant on well sewage polluted well water. In 1876, through compulsory purchase of  the city’s water works,  Chamberlain created the Birmingham Corporation Water Department.  During his tenure clean water and gas was made available to more people, public schools, municipal swimming pools and museums were built and major slum cleanance undertaken.

In 1893, George Cadbury bought 120 acres of land close to his Bournville chocolate works and built at his own expense a village to ‘alleviate the evils of modern more cramped living conditions’. By 1900, the estate included 313 cottages and houses set on 330 acres

Post-war boom

In the 20th century Birmingham developed new industries to meet changing demands for electrical goods and car manufacturing.  Birmingham also continued as a major munitions manufacturer to meet the demands of the First and Second World Wars. As  important munitions centre, Birmingham was bombed heavily during the second world war, resulting in 2,214 people in the city dying.

The 1950’s saw a post war boom, causing a huge growth in employment in the engineering and motor industries that could not be met from the UK population. So new communities from the Indian sub-continent and the Carribean came to make Bmingham their home .

Today

Since the worldwide  economic upheavals of the 1970’s and 1980’s Birmingham has shifted its focus from manufacturing to a service based economy, benefiting from being the regional capital and centre for employment and commerce. Innovative new industries are rapidly making Birmingham their home, from graphic designers to computer game programmers,  supported by Birmingham’s world-renowned universities and colleges.

Stone Floor Cleaning Sealing Restoration Birmingham

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/stone-restoration-birmingham/

lady-in-leicester-worried-about-her-dirty-stone-floor

Stone Floor Cleaning Birmingham For A Wonderful Clean Look

  • Is Your Messy, Dull Tile Floor Giving You Sleepless Nights
  • Planning To Restore A Slate Floor.
  • Has Your Indian Sandstone Floor Lost Its Appeal.


LET ME HELP


CLICK TO START

Reviews From Some Of Our Happy Customers

Check Out How We Solve These Stone Floor Problems

  • Dull spots and etch marks
  • Grimy Lifeless Finish
  • Scuffs and Scratches
  • Ugly Holes
  • Horrible Grout
  • Loss Of Colour
  • Worn Sealer
  • Dirty Tiles
  • Deep Scratches and Chips
  • Uneven tiles and Lippage

As well as looking beautiful, your floor will be so much easier to clean. High-quality sealers and finishes make your stone highly water and soil repellent, which means that they are easier to clean.

Our technical experts will also give you a tailored care guide, showing you:

  • how often you should clean your floor
  • the best way to clean your floor
  • the best equipment to use
  • the right floor cleaners that will help protect your floor rather than damage it.

The result is a beautiful clean floor that will stay clean for longer

In Just Four Easy Steps Your Stone Floors Can Look Beautiful Again

1. Contact Us By Email Or Phone

Call 0800 6795 0180 or click right here to contact us.

2. Tell Us All About Your Problems

Our contact form gives you the opportunity to tell us all about the issues with your floor. A picture speaks a thousand words, so please send photos of your floors highlighting the issues. We may call you to have a chat about your floor to understand your problems.

3. Receive A Free Of Charge Cost Estimate

In most situations we can give you a reasonable guide of the costs included in any restoration.

We sill send you full documentation, detailing;

  • The costs.
    • There’ll be no covert costs or surcharges, our rates will be completely up front.
  • The work involved.
    • We will include details about similar work we have done so you can get an idea of what’s involved and the finish you will get.
  • The timescale.

So you are armed with all the information you need to make a considered, informed decision.

4. Agree A Date To Start The Work

If you feel that the estimated cost is within your budget, we’ll organize an appointment to start the work. A couple of days prior to your job, if you prefer, we can give you a call to confirm that is ok and validate the details.

We will show up on the agreed date and at the agreed to start work.

Get In Touch
You can always phone us on 0800 695 0180 or just complete the simple contact form below for a free quotation.

We service the following postal code districts in Birmingham

B1–B4 (Birmingham City Centre, Ladywood), B5 (Digbeth), B6 (Aston), B7 (Nechells), B8 (Washwood Heath, Ward End, Saltley), B9 (Bordesley Green), B10 (Small Heath), B11 (Sparkhill, Tyseley), B12 (Balsall Heath, Sparkbrook), B13 (Moseley, Billesley), B14 (Kings Heath, Yardley Wood, Brandwood, Druids Heath, Warstock), B15 (Edgbaston, Chad Valley), B16 (Edgbaston, Ladywood), B17 (Harborne), B18 (Winson Green), B19 (Lozells, Newtown, Birchfield), B20 (Birchfield, Handsworth Wood), B21 (Handsworth), B23-B23 (Erdington, Short Heath), B24 (Erdington, Tyburn), B25 (Yardley), B26 (Sheldon, Yardley), B27 (Acocks Green), B28 (Hall Green), B29 (Selly Oak, Bournbrook), B30 (Bournville, Cotteridge, Stirchley), B31 (Northfield), B32 (Woodgate, Bartley Green, Quinton), B33 (Kitts Green), B34 (Shard End, Buckland End), B35 (Castle Vale), B36 (Hodge Hill, Castle Bromwich), B37 (Chelmsley Wood, Marston Green), B38 (Kings Norton), B40 (National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham International Airport), B42 (Perry Barr, Great Barr, Hamstead), B43 (Great Barr), B44 (Perry Barr, Kingstanding, Great Barr), B45 (Rednal, Rubery), B46 (Water Orton, Coleshill), B47 (Hollywood, Wythall), B48 (Alvechurch), B49–B50 (Alcester), B60–B61 (Bromsgrove), B62–B63 (Halesowen), B64 (Cradley Heath), B65 (Rowley Regis), B66–B67 (Smethwick), B68–B69 (Oldbury), B70–B71 (West Bromwich), B72 (Sutton Coldfield town centre, Maney, Wylde Green), B73 (Boldmere, New Oscott, Wylde Green), B74 (Four Oaks, Mere Green, Little Aston, Streetly), B75 (Sutton Trinity, Falcon Lodge, Rectory), B76 (Walmley), B77–B79 (Tamworth), B80 (Studley), B90 (Shirley, Wythall, Majors Green, Dickens Heath), B91–B94 (Olton, Solihull), B95 (Henley-in-Arden), B96–B98 (Redditch)

Birmingham was known as the “city of  a thousand trades” as it was a world leader in the manufacturing items like buckles, guns, jewlery and pens.

The history of Birmingham dates back 10,500 years ago with habitation along the valley of the river Rea. The Doomsday Book of 1086, records Birmingham having 9 houses valued at £1. However in 1166 Peter de Birmingham was granted the rights to hold a weekly market, transforming the prospects of the small settlement. The market was located around St.Martin’s church, one of the oldest buildings in Birmingham. The markets still exist in the same place over 800 years later.

In the 16th century Birmingham gradually transformed from a market town into a major industrial centre. With the benefit of it’s location in the centre of the country, road links and natural resources, the area drew industries such as cutlery, weapons and guns.

In the 18th century, Birmingham had become a major European centre for metalworking, producing buckles, buttons and small metal fabrications. The industry was dominated by the manufacturers Matthew Boulton and JohnTaylor. Boulton, along with James Watt and Erasmus Darwin founded the Lunar Society, recognised worldwide for  innovative and pioneering ideas in science, arts, philosophy and commerce. The Lunar Society got its name because it gathered during the full moon at Soho House , which is today a museum.

This period saw a great expansion of the canal network into Birmingham. The canals allowed quick and easy transport of raw materials and finished goods, giving Birmingham a major competitive edge over other rival manufacturing areas. Birmingham quickly became a worldwide “powerhouse” of manufacturing and invention, becoming “the City of a Thousand Trades’ and the “Toyshop of Europe”.

In 1850, Ralph Heaton set up the Birmingham mint to strike coins and medals. In1853, owing to a lack of capacity at the Royal Mint in London, the Birmingham mint won it’s first contract to strike British coins. In two years the mint struck over 500 tons of copper. During their peak the Birmingham mint was striking around 1100,000 coins per day.

Birmingham was also a major manufacturer of steel pen nibs, claiming that 75% of everything written in the world at the time was written with a  pen made in Birmingham.

Today, over 40% of the UK’s hand made jewelry products are made in Birmigham’s world famous Jewelry Quarter.

The rapid economic growth of the 19th century led to massive growth in the city’s population. The mid 19th century saw the development of  Back to Back housing as aresponse to the rapidly increasing population. Economic growth brought great propserity  a small number of people, but many people saw little benefit.  The increase in population saw housing conditions fall, with poor education and health worstening during the Industrial Revolution. Thankfully there were people who set out to make changes. Reform had started in 1799 when Dr John Ash, supported by wealthy individuals such as Matthew Boulton, built a the Birmingham free hospital.

In the late 19th century, lead by Joseph Chamberlain, Birmingham became an international leader in social reform.  Over half of the population of Birmingham was dependant on well sewage polluted well water. In 1876, through compulsory purchase of  the city’s water works,  Chamberlain created the Birmingham Corporation Water Department.  During his tenure clean water and gas was made available to more people, public schools, municipal swimming pools and museums were built and major slum cleanance undertaken.

In 1893, George Cadbury bought 120 acres of land close to his Bournville chocolate works and built at his own expense a village to ‘alleviate the evils of modern more cramped living conditions’. By 1900, the estate included 313 cottages and houses set on 330 acres

Post-war boom

In the 20th century Birmingham developed new industries to meet changing demands for electrical goods and car manufacturing.  Birmingham also continued as a major munitions manufacturer to meet the demands of the First and Second World Wars. As  important munitions centre, Birmingham was bombed heavily during the second world war, resulting in 2,214 people in the city dying.

The 1950’s saw a post war boom, causing a huge growth in employment in the engineering and motor industries that could not be met from the UK population. So new communities from the Indian sub-continent and the Carribean came to make Bmingham their home .

Today

Since the worldwide  economic upheavals of the 1970’s and 1980’s Birmingham has shifted its focus from manufacturing to a service based economy, benefiting from being the regional capital and centre for employment and commerce. Innovative new industries are rapidly making Birmingham their home, from graphic designers to computer game programmers,  supported by Birmingham’s world-renowned universities and colleges.

Stone Floor Cleaning Sealing Restoration Birmingham

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/stone-restoration-birmingham/

lady-in-leicester-worried-about-her-dirty-stone-floor

Stone Floor Cleaning Birmingham For A Wonderful Clean Look

  • Is Your Messy, Dull Tile Floor Giving You Sleepless Nights
  • Planning To Restore A Slate Floor.
  • Has Your Indian Sandstone Floor Lost Its Appeal.


LET ME HELP


CLICK TO START

Reviews From Some Of Our Happy Customers

Check Out How We Solve These Stone Floor Problems

  • Dull spots and etch marks
  • Grimy Lifeless Finish
  • Scuffs and Scratches
  • Ugly Holes
  • Horrible Grout
  • Loss Of Colour
  • Worn Sealer
  • Dirty Tiles
  • Deep Scratches and Chips
  • Uneven tiles and Lippage

As well as looking beautiful, your floor will be so much easier to clean. High-quality sealers and finishes make your stone highly water and soil repellent, which means that they are easier to clean.

Our technical experts will also give you a tailored care guide, showing you:

  • how often you should clean your floor
  • the best way to clean your floor
  • the best equipment to use
  • the right floor cleaners that will help protect your floor rather than damage it.

The result is a beautiful clean floor that will stay clean for longer

In Just Four Easy Steps Your Stone Floors Can Look Beautiful Again

1. Contact Us By Email Or Phone

Call 0800 6795 0180 or click right here to contact us.

2. Tell Us All About Your Problems

Our contact form gives you the opportunity to tell us all about the issues with your floor. A picture speaks a thousand words, so please send photos of your floors highlighting the issues. We may call you to have a chat about your floor to understand your problems.

3. Receive A Free Of Charge Cost Estimate

In most situations we can give you a reasonable guide of the costs included in any restoration.

We sill send you full documentation, detailing;

  • The costs.
    • There’ll be no covert costs or surcharges, our rates will be completely up front.
  • The work involved.
    • We will include details about similar work we have done so you can get an idea of what’s involved and the finish you will get.
  • The timescale.

So you are armed with all the information you need to make a considered, informed decision.

4. Agree A Date To Start The Work

If you feel that the estimated cost is within your budget, we’ll organize an appointment to start the work. A couple of days prior to your job, if you prefer, we can give you a call to confirm that is ok and validate the details.

We will show up on the agreed date and at the agreed to start work.

Get In Touch
You can always phone us on 0800 695 0180 or just complete the simple contact form below for a free quotation.

We service the following postal code districts in Birmingham

B1–B4 (Birmingham City Centre, Ladywood), B5 (Digbeth), B6 (Aston), B7 (Nechells), B8 (Washwood Heath, Ward End, Saltley), B9 (Bordesley Green), B10 (Small Heath), B11 (Sparkhill, Tyseley), B12 (Balsall Heath, Sparkbrook), B13 (Moseley, Billesley), B14 (Kings Heath, Yardley Wood, Brandwood, Druids Heath, Warstock), B15 (Edgbaston, Chad Valley), B16 (Edgbaston, Ladywood), B17 (Harborne), B18 (Winson Green), B19 (Lozells, Newtown, Birchfield), B20 (Birchfield, Handsworth Wood), B21 (Handsworth), B23-B23 (Erdington, Short Heath), B24 (Erdington, Tyburn), B25 (Yardley), B26 (Sheldon, Yardley), B27 (Acocks Green), B28 (Hall Green), B29 (Selly Oak, Bournbrook), B30 (Bournville, Cotteridge, Stirchley), B31 (Northfield), B32 (Woodgate, Bartley Green, Quinton), B33 (Kitts Green), B34 (Shard End, Buckland End), B35 (Castle Vale), B36 (Hodge Hill, Castle Bromwich), B37 (Chelmsley Wood, Marston Green), B38 (Kings Norton), B40 (National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham International Airport), B42 (Perry Barr, Great Barr, Hamstead), B43 (Great Barr), B44 (Perry Barr, Kingstanding, Great Barr), B45 (Rednal, Rubery), B46 (Water Orton, Coleshill), B47 (Hollywood, Wythall), B48 (Alvechurch), B49–B50 (Alcester), B60–B61 (Bromsgrove), B62–B63 (Halesowen), B64 (Cradley Heath), B65 (Rowley Regis), B66–B67 (Smethwick), B68–B69 (Oldbury), B70–B71 (West Bromwich), B72 (Sutton Coldfield town centre, Maney, Wylde Green), B73 (Boldmere, New Oscott, Wylde Green), B74 (Four Oaks, Mere Green, Little Aston, Streetly), B75 (Sutton Trinity, Falcon Lodge, Rectory), B76 (Walmley), B77–B79 (Tamworth), B80 (Studley), B90 (Shirley, Wythall, Majors Green, Dickens Heath), B91–B94 (Olton, Solihull), B95 (Henley-in-Arden), B96–B98 (Redditch)

Birmingham was known as the “city of  a thousand trades” as it was a world leader in the manufacturing items like buckles, guns, jewlery and pens.

The history of Birmingham dates back 10,500 years ago with habitation along the valley of the river Rea. The Doomsday Book of 1086, records Birmingham having 9 houses valued at £1. However in 1166 Peter de Birmingham was granted the rights to hold a weekly market, transforming the prospects of the small settlement. The market was located around St.Martin’s church, one of the oldest buildings in Birmingham. The markets still exist in the same place over 800 years later.

In the 16th century Birmingham gradually transformed from a market town into a major industrial centre. With the benefit of it’s location in the centre of the country, road links and natural resources, the area drew industries such as cutlery, weapons and guns.

In the 18th century, Birmingham had become a major European centre for metalworking, producing buckles, buttons and small metal fabrications. The industry was dominated by the manufacturers Matthew Boulton and JohnTaylor. Boulton, along with James Watt and Erasmus Darwin founded the Lunar Society, recognised worldwide for  innovative and pioneering ideas in science, arts, philosophy and commerce. The Lunar Society got its name because it gathered during the full moon at Soho House , which is today a museum.

This period saw a great expansion of the canal network into Birmingham. The canals allowed quick and easy transport of raw materials and finished goods, giving Birmingham a major competitive edge over other rival manufacturing areas. Birmingham quickly became a worldwide “powerhouse” of manufacturing and invention, becoming “the City of a Thousand Trades’ and the “Toyshop of Europe”.

In 1850, Ralph Heaton set up the Birmingham mint to strike coins and medals. In1853, owing to a lack of capacity at the Royal Mint in London, the Birmingham mint won it’s first contract to strike British coins. In two years the mint struck over 500 tons of copper. During their peak the Birmingham mint was striking around 1100,000 coins per day.

Birmingham was also a major manufacturer of steel pen nibs, claiming that 75% of everything written in the world at the time was written with a  pen made in Birmingham.

Today, over 40% of the UK’s hand made jewelry products are made in Birmigham’s world famous Jewelry Quarter.

The rapid economic growth of the 19th century led to massive growth in the city’s population. The mid 19th century saw the development of  Back to Back housing as aresponse to the rapidly increasing population. Economic growth brought great propserity  a small number of people, but many people saw little benefit.  The increase in population saw housing conditions fall, with poor education and health worstening during the Industrial Revolution. Thankfully there were people who set out to make changes. Reform had started in 1799 when Dr John Ash, supported by wealthy individuals such as Matthew Boulton, built a the Birmingham free hospital.

In the late 19th century, lead by Joseph Chamberlain, Birmingham became an international leader in social reform.  Over half of the population of Birmingham was dependant on well sewage polluted well water. In 1876, through compulsory purchase of  the city’s water works,  Chamberlain created the Birmingham Corporation Water Department.  During his tenure clean water and gas was made available to more people, public schools, municipal swimming pools and museums were built and major slum cleanance undertaken.

In 1893, George Cadbury bought 120 acres of land close to his Bournville chocolate works and built at his own expense a village to ‘alleviate the evils of modern more cramped living conditions’. By 1900, the estate included 313 cottages and houses set on 330 acres

Post-war boom

In the 20th century Birmingham developed new industries to meet changing demands for electrical goods and car manufacturing.  Birmingham also continued as a major munitions manufacturer to meet the demands of the First and Second World Wars. As  important munitions centre, Birmingham was bombed heavily during the second world war, resulting in 2,214 people in the city dying.

The 1950’s saw a post war boom, causing a huge growth in employment in the engineering and motor industries that could not be met from the UK population. So new communities from the Indian sub-continent and the Carribean came to make Bmingham their home .

Today

Since the worldwide  economic upheavals of the 1970’s and 1980’s Birmingham has shifted its focus from manufacturing to a service based economy, benefiting from being the regional capital and centre for employment and commerce. Innovative new industries are rapidly making Birmingham their home, from graphic designers to computer game programmers,  supported by Birmingham’s world-renowned universities and colleges.

Natural Stone Restoration Cleaning Sealing UK

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/natural-stone-restoration-cleaning-sealing-uk/

Image of David Allen Owner of Abbey Floor Care

I’m David Allen – The Owner Of Abbey Floor Care

Natural Stone Restoration Cleaning & Sealing Services


Get in touch

How Can I Help You?

All The Pictures Show Actual Natural Stone Restoration Jobs By Abbey Floor Care

Marble


abbey floor care marble polishing picture

Travertine


abbey floorcare travertine polishing image

Limestone


image of abbey floor care limestone restoration

Terrazzo


image of terrazzo restoration by abbey floor care

Granite


image of granite polishing by abbey floor care

Slate


image of abbey floor care cleaning and re-sealing chinese slate floor

Sandstone


image of abbeyfloorcare cleaning and sealing a sandstone floor

Let’s restore your natural stone floor to its original beauty!


Get your free quote

“My floor looks brand new and fabulous. I’m so pleased.”

 

Mrs. Alhmbrasani

Contact Us

Complete This Simple Contact Form For A Free Quotation

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Please give the approximate sizes of your floors, the condition – (chips, scratches, marks, lippage, dity grout} etc.

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David Allen Natural Stone Restoration SpecialistYou may try to restore your natural stone floor yourself. Or you may ignore the problem, in the hope that your family, guests and visitors will not see it.

However, it is unlikely that you will have any lasting success.

This is because when a stone floor problem becomes visible, it is often way past a do it yourself solution.

This is because we look at our floors when we are standing.

So when a floor looks dirty it is absolutely packed with dirt, because the dirt has become ingrained in the surface.

When a stone floor starts to look dull it will be full of scratches and soils that mopping will not solve.

Over the years, stone floor tiles can lose their lustre, requiring a deep clean and reseal, generally referred to as natural stone restoration. You have made a significant investment in your stone floors, so the last thing you want to do is change them when they get dirty.

Daily cleaning and maintenance are critical to maintaining a beautiful, clean surface. But cleaning alone is not enough. A well organised, consistent cleaning schedule will not prevent stains and scratches making the floor dull and difficult to clean.

To make sure your floor is always looking at its best, you will need to hire a professional natural stone restoration company to help bring back the original finish.

Abbey Floor Care offers a range of cleaning and sealing solutions for your stone floors at reasonable costs. Floor cleaning and sealing costs depend on the type of floor and the level of cleaning you want.

When thinking about natural stone restoration, it is easier to split it into two broad categories, calcium and non-calcium stones.

Popular calcuim stones are Limestone, Marble, Travertine and Terrazzo.

Limestone
Calcite Stones started their life as the shells and skeletons of sea creatures. Over time the shells and skeletons accumulated on the seabed. Eventually, with pressure and time, the calcium carbonate sediment hardens into limestone.

Limestone is mostly used in flooring with a natural, matte, or honed, mid to high sheen finish.

Travertine
When water passes through limestone; it dissolves the calcium into the water. Eventually, the water deposits the dissolved calcium along with other minerals, forming a stone called Travertine. The presence of water causes with calcium to give off gases that give Travertine its honeycombed structure

The other mineral deposits contribute to travertine’s colouring. So, travertine is available in a variety of shades, from the lightest ivory and darker walnut shades to dark browns and deep reds.

Travertine is mostly used in flooring with a natural, matte, or honed mid to high sheen finish. The honeycomb structure means that the stone is filled to allow a smooth uniform finish. However, over time, the filler can come loose, leaving holes to fill with soil.

Marble
Marble is a recrystallized form of limestone, transformed by heat or pressure deep inside the earth. The dense crystalline structure means that you can polish Marble to a lustrous, beautiful shine.

Mineral impurities in Marble allow it to come in a variety of colours including but not limited to, white, cream, pink, green, brown, grey and black.

The metamorphosis from limestone does not make it harder. So, compared to granite, marble is a relatively soft stone, so it has little resistance to scratched and damage.

Terrazzo
Terrazzo is a composite flooring made from mixing Portland stone or epoxy with marble chips. The presence of marble means that the terrazzo must be cleaned and maintained as if it were marble.

Most people consider Limestone, Marble, Travertine and Terrazzo as wearing and durable. But the properties that make them attractive contribute to their vulnerability.

Strong acids and alkalis will dissolve calcium, so they will damage these surface of these stones Vinegar, wine, lemon juice, tea and coffee will etch the surface and remove the polish. Repeated exposure to acid spills will erode the surface still further.

While some types of limestone such as Staffordshire Limestone can be considered as hard, in general limestone, marble, travertine and terrazzo are relatively soft compared to a hard stone like Granite.

This means that they are easily damaged by abrasion from foot traffic and scratching from dragging furniture across a floor.

Professional natural stone restoration of limestone, marble, travertine and granite usually starts with grinding or honing the surface of the floor to remove scratches and deep soiling.

Limestone, terrazzo and travertine can be honed to light or high sheen finish.

Marble is generally honed and polished to a deep lustrous shine.

Finally the floor is sealed with an appropriate sealer.

Considerable experience and specialised equipment are needed for this kind of natural stone restoraiton. So you should take care to hire the services of a company you can trust.

All other types of stone come under the classification of Non-Calcilus Stones

Granite

Granite is an igneous rock, which means that it is formed from molten lava as it cools.

Granite is hard enough to resist most abrasion, strong enough to bear significant weight, inert enough to withstand chemical attack and it can be polished to a deep shine. Granite is also one of the more expensive stones.

These characteristics make it a highly desirable stone counter tops and luxurious floors.

If you are considering granite, make sure you know which stone you are considering. Commercial granite is used to cover a range of igneous rocks including gabbro, basalt, pegmatite, schist, gneiss, syenite, monzonite, anorthosite, granodiorite, diabase, diorite.

These stones may not have the wear characteristics you expect from a traditional granite.

In most cases, granite can be repolished with fine abrasives and polishing equipment. In rare cases, the surface may be badly scratched or damaged. In this case, the damage will need to be ground away before the floor can be re-polished.

Sandstone/Flagstone

Sandstone is formed from the grains of weathered stone. Clay or silt acts as a cement binding the sand grains together.

Sandstone is generally used for flooring in its natural state. This means that the surface of the stone is left rough.

The surface finish means that it is not easy to mop sandstone without leaving some of the dirty water on the surface or in the grout. Over time the soil builds up, hiding the natural colours.

Professional sandstone cleaning usually starts with scrubbing a high alkali cleaner into the surface of the floor. The cleaner will emulsify the soil and lift it away from the stone. Hot water pressurised rinsing removes the dirty slurry, leaving a pristine clean floor.

Once the floor has dried, it should be sealed. An impregnating sealer will leave the original surface. A surface sealer will leave an easier to clean smoother surface.

Slate, Quarry Tile, Victorian Minton Tile

While slate is a natural stone and quarry tile and minton tile are man made, they all have similar characteristics regarding cleaning, because they are all formed from clay.

Historically, linseed oil and waxes were used to finish these floors after installation.

Professional cleaning starts with removing any existing finish residues. However, we have come across a variety of finish residues, that we could only remove with the most powerful paint removers.

Experience is essential to make sure that the cleaning does not damage the tiles. Clay is a soft material that can be damaged by aggressive cleaning and over-wetting.

Very often the issue with old floors is not the flooring itself, but the sub-floor.

Quarry tiles, Victorian clay tiles, as well as flagstones, were often laid on nothing more than earth, ash or sand. While this in itself is not a huge problem, the lack of any insulation makes for a cold floor underfoot.

These floors were designed to be ‘breathable’. Covering them with non-breathable coverings like vinyl or heavy rugs will cause problems. The cover will stop the floor breathing, causing cement like deposits on the surface of the tiles and the surface breaking away on some tiles.

We can restore the majority of “breathable” floors to a beautiful finish. Once finished they can be sealed with impregnating sealers that enhance the natural colour of the tiles, while still allowing the floor to breathe.

If the floor tiles on an insulating base, they can be finished with a natural wax or acrylic surface finish.

Natural Stone Restoration Cleaning Sealing UK

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/natural-stone-restoration-cleaning-sealing-uk/

Image of David Allen Owner of Abbey Floor Care

I’m David Allen – The Owner Of Abbey Floor Care

Natural Stone Restoration Cleaning & Sealing Services


Get in touch

How Can I Help You?

All The Pictures Show Actual Natural Stone Restoration Jobs By Abbey Floor Care

Marble


abbey floor care marble polishing picture

Travertine


abbey floorcare travertine polishing image

Limestone


image of abbey floor care limestone restoration

Terrazzo


image of terrazzo restoration by abbey floor care

Granite


image of granite polishing by abbey floor care

Slate


image of abbey floor care cleaning and re-sealing chinese slate floor

Sandstone


image of abbeyfloorcare cleaning and sealing a sandstone floor

Let’s restore your natural stone floor to its original beauty!


Get your free quote

“My floor looks brand new and fabulous. I’m so pleased.”

 

Mrs. Alhmbrasani

Contact Us

Complete This Simple Contact Form For A Free Quotation

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Town or Post Code (required)

Subject(required)

Your Message (required)
Please give the approximate sizes of your floors, the condition – (chips, scratches, marks, lippage, dity grout} etc.

If you have any images, please upload them below, max 4 images




David Allen Natural Stone Restoration SpecialistYou may try to restore your natural stone floor yourself. Or you may ignore the problem, in the hope that your family, guests and visitors will not see it.

However, it is unlikely that you will have any lasting success.

This is because when a stone floor problem becomes visible, it is often way past a do it yourself solution.

This is because we look at our floors when we are standing.

So when a floor looks dirty it is absolutely packed with dirt, because the dirt has become ingrained in the surface.

When a stone floor starts to look dull it will be full of scratches and soils that mopping will not solve.

Over the years, stone floor tiles can lose their lustre, requiring a deep clean and reseal, generally referred to as natural stone restoration. You have made a significant investment in your stone floors, so the last thing you want to do is change them when they get dirty.

Daily cleaning and maintenance are critical to maintaining a beautiful, clean surface. But cleaning alone is not enough. A well organised, consistent cleaning schedule will not prevent stains and scratches making the floor dull and difficult to clean.

To make sure your floor is always looking at its best, you will need to hire a professional natural stone restoration company to help bring back the original finish.

Abbey Floor Care offers a range of cleaning and sealing solutions for your stone floors at reasonable costs. Floor cleaning and sealing costs depend on the type of floor and the level of cleaning you want.

When thinking about natural stone restoration, it is easier to split it into two broad categories, calcium and non-calcium stones.

Popular calcuim stones are Limestone, Marble, Travertine and Terrazzo.

Limestone
Calcite Stones started their life as the shells and skeletons of sea creatures. Over time the shells and skeletons accumulated on the seabed. Eventually, with pressure and time, the calcium carbonate sediment hardens into limestone.

Limestone is mostly used in flooring with a natural, matte, or honed, mid to high sheen finish.

Travertine
When water passes through limestone; it dissolves the calcium into the water. Eventually, the water deposits the dissolved calcium along with other minerals, forming a stone called Travertine. The presence of water causes with calcium to give off gases that give Travertine its honeycombed structure

The other mineral deposits contribute to travertine’s colouring. So, travertine is available in a variety of shades, from the lightest ivory and darker walnut shades to dark browns and deep reds.

Travertine is mostly used in flooring with a natural, matte, or honed mid to high sheen finish. The honeycomb structure means that the stone is filled to allow a smooth uniform finish. However, over time, the filler can come loose, leaving holes to fill with soil.

Marble
Marble is a recrystallized form of limestone, transformed by heat or pressure deep inside the earth. The dense crystalline structure means that you can polish Marble to a lustrous, beautiful shine.

Mineral impurities in Marble allow it to come in a variety of colours including but not limited to, white, cream, pink, green, brown, grey and black.

The metamorphosis from limestone does not make it harder. So, compared to granite, marble is a relatively soft stone, so it has little resistance to scratched and damage.

Terrazzo
Terrazzo is a composite flooring made from mixing Portland stone or epoxy with marble chips. The presence of marble means that the terrazzo must be cleaned and maintained as if it were marble.

Most people consider Limestone, Marble, Travertine and Terrazzo as wearing and durable. But the properties that make them attractive contribute to their vulnerability.

Strong acids and alkalis will dissolve calcium, so they will damage these surface of these stones Vinegar, wine, lemon juice, tea and coffee will etch the surface and remove the polish. Repeated exposure to acid spills will erode the surface still further.

While some types of limestone such as Staffordshire Limestone can be considered as hard, in general limestone, marble, travertine and terrazzo are relatively soft compared to a hard stone like Granite.

This means that they are easily damaged by abrasion from foot traffic and scratching from dragging furniture across a floor.

Professional natural stone restoration of limestone, marble, travertine and granite usually starts with grinding or honing the surface of the floor to remove scratches and deep soiling.

Limestone, terrazzo and travertine can be honed to light or high sheen finish.

Marble is generally honed and polished to a deep lustrous shine.

Finally the floor is sealed with an appropriate sealer.

Considerable experience and specialised equipment are needed for this kind of natural stone restoraiton. So you should take care to hire the services of a company you can trust.

All other types of stone come under the classification of Non-Calcilus Stones

Granite

Granite is an igneous rock, which means that it is formed from molten lava as it cools.

Granite is hard enough to resist most abrasion, strong enough to bear significant weight, inert enough to withstand chemical attack and it can be polished to a deep shine. Granite is also one of the more expensive stones.

These characteristics make it a highly desirable stone counter tops and luxurious floors.

If you are considering granite, make sure you know which stone you are considering. Commercial granite is used to cover a range of igneous rocks including gabbro, basalt, pegmatite, schist, gneiss, syenite, monzonite, anorthosite, granodiorite, diabase, diorite.

These stones may not have the wear characteristics you expect from a traditional granite.

In most cases, granite can be repolished with fine abrasives and polishing equipment. In rare cases, the surface may be badly scratched or damaged. In this case, the damage will need to be ground away before the floor can be re-polished.

Sandstone/Flagstone

Sandstone is formed from the grains of weathered stone. Clay or silt acts as a cement binding the sand grains together.

Sandstone is generally used for flooring in its natural state. This means that the surface of the stone is left rough.

The surface finish means that it is not easy to mop sandstone without leaving some of the dirty water on the surface or in the grout. Over time the soil builds up, hiding the natural colours.

Professional sandstone cleaning usually starts with scrubbing a high alkali cleaner into the surface of the floor. The cleaner will emulsify the soil and lift it away from the stone. Hot water pressurised rinsing removes the dirty slurry, leaving a pristine clean floor.

Once the floor has dried, it should be sealed. An impregnating sealer will leave the original surface. A surface sealer will leave an easier to clean smoother surface.

Slate, Quarry Tile, Victorian Minton Tile

While slate is a natural stone and quarry tile and minton tile are man made, they all have similar characteristics regarding cleaning, because they are all formed from clay.

Historically, linseed oil and waxes were used to finish these floors after installation.

Professional cleaning starts with removing any existing finish residues. However, we have come across a variety of finish residues, that we could only remove with the most powerful paint removers.

Experience is essential to make sure that the cleaning does not damage the tiles. Clay is a soft material that can be damaged by aggressive cleaning and over-wetting.

Very often the issue with old floors is not the flooring itself, but the sub-floor.

Quarry tiles, Victorian clay tiles, as well as flagstones, were often laid on nothing more than earth, ash or sand. While this in itself is not a huge problem, the lack of any insulation makes for a cold floor underfoot.

These floors were designed to be ‘breathable’. Covering them with non-breathable coverings like vinyl or heavy rugs will cause problems. The cover will stop the floor breathing, causing cement like deposits on the surface of the tiles and the surface breaking away on some tiles.

We can restore the majority of “breathable” floors to a beautiful finish. Once finished they can be sealed with impregnating sealers that enhance the natural colour of the tiles, while still allowing the floor to breathe.

If the floor tiles on an insulating base, they can be finished with a natural wax or acrylic surface finish.

Check Out This Great Restoration Job We Did On A Tumbled Travertine Floor In Rhyl Denbighshire LL8

This post was first shown on http://www.abbeyfloorcare.co.uk/travertine/tumbled-travertine-restoration-rhyl-ll18/

How Much Does It Cost To Clean And Seal Travertine

We were called asked about our tumbled travertine restoration service because our client had a number of problems with their floor in Rhyl, Denbighshire. They were particularly interested in the cost and the work involved so they could budget for the work.

After a quick chat, we agreed that there were two particular problems they were looking to solve.

First: As with many tumbled travertine floors, the holes and crevices had filled with dirt, making the floor look dirty and difficult to keep clean.

Second: The floor had suffered from severe settling, causing many long cracks throughout the floor. Over time the cracks had filled with dirt, leaving long black lines throughout the floor.

 

dirty travertine floor

 

The homeowner had done their best to look after their tumbled travertine floor, cleaning it regularly and re-sealing it a few times. But they had become increasingly frustrated that all their good work did not last very long so searched for tumbled travertine restoration specialists.

The floor was originally sealed with an impregnating sealer.

However as the surface had worn, the sealer could not prevent soil locking into the floor. Given the amount of traffic on the floor, we recommended using a hard wearing surface sealer.

This kind of sealer will protect the surface of the stone and act as a sacrificial wear layer, that can be topped up when it shows signs of wear.

Our Tumbled Travertine Restoration Proposal

We proposed to deep clean the floor, fill the problem cracks and apply a high quality long-lasting surface sealer.

The cost for the work was in the region of £1.200.00

The Travertine Floor Restoration Work

On our first visit, we cleaned and sealed a sample area. We also filled with an epoxy grout filler. The filler did a great job. However, it was a lighter colour than the sealed stone. Unfortunately, we could not source a better colour match, as the grout is only readily available in one colour.

tumbled travertine restoration Rhyl Denbighshire LL8 sample repair

On the first day we installed protection to the surrounding walls, adjoining wood floor and bespoke hand painted kitchen furniture. The tiles are slightly uneven, and in this situation any brushing process will cause splashes.

While we always take extreme care to minimise any splashing, better safe than sorry. This process took just over two hours. When the job was finished, it took only minutes to remove the protection!

The remainder of the day was spent deep cleaning the floor with a heavy duty cleaning chemical, agitated into the stone with a rotary scrubbing machine.

We removed the slurry with our “clean and capture” equipment. This is our “secret weapon” for tumbled travertine restoration work. Hot water is sprayed under pressure into the surface of the stone. The pressurised water swirls in the holes and over the stone to lift out ingrained soil. The slurry is immediately vacuumed away into the recovery tank in our truck.

clean and capture equipment
tumbled-travertine-before-after

The pressure rinse had the added advantage of cleaning out the cracks and carrying away any loose stone from the cracks, leaving them ready for filling.

The floor was left overnight to dry.

On the second day, we filled the cracks with a Jasmine epoxy grout filler. This work took around 4 hours to complete as the cleaning revealed additional cracks!

travertine crack repair

We Used The Best Travertine Tile Sealer For This Installation

Tumbled travertie is characterised by the natural holes and voids in the surface. The holes and voids will fill with soil that becomes difficult to remove with normal cleaning. Because of this, we applied a heavy duty industrial sealer that is resistant to harsh chemicals and abrasionWe sealed the floor with three coats of synthetic acrylic floor sealer. This kind of sealer is extremely hard wearing, ideal for this situation.

Because of this, we applied a heavy duty industrial sealer that is resistant to harsh chemicals and abrasion. So the floor can be scrubbed without removing the protective seal.

We sealed the floor with three thick coats of the floor sealer, giving an attractive, hard-wearing mid-sheen finish.

travertine sealer

The homeowner was delighted with the finish saying that the floor had never looked this good.

If your floor needs some tlc, please contact us about our travertine restoration services.